Great Britain Part Three (Stonehenge, Bath and Lacock)

irst off just an FYI I’ve been a little slow in getting out these posts because of purchasing my new to me RV and trying to get settled in that along with my campground host duties, so sorry about that.

On our third day in Great Britain, Bonnie and I had pre-booked a day trip to Stonehenge which also included stops in the city of Bath and a historical village of Lacock. We had to get up really early (4 AM) to take a taxi to a different hotel in downtown London where we would be picked up in our minibus to arrive at Stonehenge just before sunrise (it was a couple hour bus ride from London to Stonehenge). It rained off and on, as we rode there but stopped just as we arrived. We had chosen this tour because it would allow us to enter the Stonehenge grounds before it was open to the public and explore the inner circle which is no longer allowed to be done by general public. It was a cool and overcast morning but when we arrived in the area we were treated to spectacular views of the unusual prehistoric monument.

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The neat thing is we got to walk amongst the stones and check out the area before any other people arrived there was a small group of about 20 of us. Tour groups get special permission on certain days to bring groups at sunrise and then again at sunset to explore the inner circle. The grounds are patrolled 24 hours a day to make sure that no vandalism is done.

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No one is sure who or why, the stones were erected here. But they were erected some time during the Stone Age. The stones have scientifically been proven to have come from a far way off and somehow erected here with simple and primitive techniques. Like the ancient Egyptian Pyramids no one is exactly sure how they were constructed but there is a lot of speculation. Another thing is there seems to be a large energy force in the area. The guide told us of stories of people’s watches stopping and other phenomenon’s. The funny thing is I had a fully charged camera battery and after only a few photos it was completely drained, this is one of the things the guide mentioned that other people had experienced. One of things that they did to show us the energy forces here, was to give you sounding rods (two small L-shaped copper wire rods that you would hold loosely in your hand and walk and they would crisscross each other when you would crisscross the energy fields). Here the guide shows me how to use them I was the first to give it a try.

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Then we all took turns and it was amazing how well it worked for everyone.

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Here Bonnie gives it a try.

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The sun trying to peek out a couple times, the rain held off and it was a beautiful morning. It was almost the autumn equinox and if the sun would have come shining through it would’ve lined up with some of the stone formations. It was a really cool experience and I’m glad we made the early morning trip to be there before the crowds arrived.

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After spending the appropriate amount of time at Stonehenge it was time to load the bus and head onto the city of Bath. Bath is a beautiful city with its origins dating back thousands of years. At present day its population is just under 90,000. The city became a spa with the Latin name Aquae Sulis  (“ the waters of Sulis”) c. AD 60 when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon. As a retreat and health spa for the wealthy of the Roman Empire. It’s a beautiful old city with lots of cool architect.

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The original Roman baths have long since crumbled but newer ones were built in their place centuries ago.

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The springs are no longer used as public baths but more as a tourist attraction and museum explaining the past history.

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The waters are strong smelling and loaded with minerals which are believed to have healing powers, but as you can see in this photo they have quite a green hue.

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You can imagine in their day the spas were quite the place to come to relax and enjoy the beauty of the area.

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One of the other buildings that we explored was the Bath Abbey, this church was originally founded in the 7th century becoming a Religious Centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. Here are a couple photos of the front entrance.

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Here’s a view of the Abbey from inside the Roman baths building with it in the background.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is one of the few churches that we were able to take photos of the inside of, it is very spectacular. It has beautiful stained glass.

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And long picturesque aisles.

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The pews have beautiful carvings.

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Look at the spectacular pipe organ.

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Bonnie even got to practice a little of her preaching.

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One of the other places we stopped in Bath was at the Royal Crescent.

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The Royal Crescent is a role of 30 terraced houses laid out in a sweeping crescent. It was designed by the architect John Wood the Younger and built between 1767 and 1774. It was built as housing for the well to do and notable people and is still occupied by the well to do today. It was built in this Crescent shape so that the residents could all look out over the beautiful gardens in the center courtyard, as they sat high on the hill overlooking the town of Bath.

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Our last stop for the day was at the village of “Lacock”.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe village is almost all in its entirety owned by the “National Trust”. The National Trust in Great Britain is a foundation similar to our Historical Society, designed to preserve historical places in unspoiled appearance.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The villages almost 200 permanent residents maintain it as a beautiful and historical landmark. With beautiful architect and gardens. Look at the hedges in this photo.

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Here is a very old barn with very steep roof so that I could hold up to the elements.

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The timbers of the barn from the inside.

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Many very old residents still used today as year-round homes.

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Most of the places in town have these Slate roofs.

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Its most recent claim to fame is being parts of some of the Harry Potter movies that were filmed in different parts of the village, like here at the Abbey in town.

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And this quaint little house was also featured in one of the movies.

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It ended up being a beautiful but long day exploring the countryside of England. You could’ve easily spent several days exploring these areas in more detail. We got back to London late afternoon, but Bonnie still had not done enough exploring for the day, so we ended up spending more time exploring some other parts of London (“I think her goal was to burn me out” LOL). Here’s one last photo of me sporting my new hat that had I purchased in this city of Bath.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThat’s it for this part more to come thanks for reading, Rick

 

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3 thoughts on “Great Britain Part Three (Stonehenge, Bath and Lacock)

  1. OH MY!! STonehenge and Bath…two of my bucket list places. I am super jealous. That tour was amazing. I didn’t know you could do that..,and I loved all the pics, especially the pipe organ!!

    Like

  2. Pingback: GOOD LUCK

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